The philosopher and political scientist and author (“” Being lazy is hard work “”) Martin Liebmann explains why it is so difficult for us – but at the same time so important.

The philosopher and political scientist and author (“” Being lazy is hard work “”) Martin Liebmann explains why it is so difficult for us – but at the same time so important.

This is unthinkable for many people today. Too great the fear that you might miss something or simply “” no time “” for it. The philosopher and political scientist and author (“” Being lazy is hard work “”) Martin Liebmann explains why it is so difficult for us – but at the same time so important.

Mr. Liebmann, haven’t you done anything today? I haven’t gotten to that today. I was probably too lazy for that.

You are on the board of the association for time delay: are you on time? Believe it or not, I’m very punctual. I consider it disrespectful to impose a delay on other people.

How often do you check the clock? Since I almost never have a watch with me, this rarely happens. The only one that I wear more often on my wrist is one without a dial and without a pointer. I like to look at them.

Why is it so difficult for us not to do anything? On the one hand, because our pace of life is so incredibly fast and carries us along like a river. Anyone who doesn’t eagerly crank their arms threatens to drown. We are also told from an early age that being lazy is indecent. But I suspect that it is so difficult for most people because we meet ourselves at leisure. What if all of a sudden there is a great void? The very idea can be scary.

Am I missing something if I do nothing? Of course! But given that we miss almost everything, that’s nothing to worry about. I think it’s wonderful to miss a lot. Instead of noticing very little of a lot of things in non-stop multitasking, I prefer to take the time and rest for the things that are really important to me.

Why should we do that at all – do nothing? To meet ourselves and to feel what a gift it is to just be. If I have to fight for every little recognition and do something, that’s not only incredibly exhausting, but also goes against happiness in life. For the ancient Greek philosophers, leisure as the sister of freedom was even one of the highest goals in life.

What is the difference between doing nothing and being bored? Boredom is an agony, while conscious inactivity is a state in which I am really free. Our constant distractions and attempts to pass the time only make us fall even faster into boredom. The more entertaining we shape our life, the faster we get bored – and the more difficult it becomes to dwell with yourself for a long time and to find leisure.

Many people think they don’t have time to do nothing. What do you advise them? I hate to give advice, especially not general advice. I prefer to ask questions. My favorite question is, “What is really, really important to you?” We all have the same amount of time every day. The differences are in how we fill them in: filled or fulfilled.123helpme Another nice question can be formulated from this.

What do you want in terms of how we deal with time? That we take more time to think together and discuss what will get better if we speed it up and what will get better if we take it slower. Time is the key to a good life and coexistence.

About the person: Martin Liebmann, born in 1966, is chairman of the Association for the Delay of Time and has made it his business to encourage people to use time more consciously. The studied philosopher and political scientist has been working as a brand consultant for 25 years and, at the age of 52, came to the realization that it should now take it easy and give more space to idleness. He prefers to do this in Sardinia, where he pauses for hours and looks at the sea.

You can get the book here. (*)

The links marked with an asterisk (*) are so-called affiliate links. If you click on such an affiliate link and shop via this link, we will receive a commission from the online shop or provider concerned. For you the price doesn’t change.

About the book: Being lazy is hard workAn ode to idleness224 pages ISBN: 978-3-8312-0546-2 We have to be effective, structured and flexible. This is what the labor market wants, and this is what the economy wants. Those who cannot assert themselves against the competition remain on the career ladder. So we work 60 hours, check our emails on Sundays and continue to optimize our morning routine. Is that good for us, our society and our environment? Martin Liebmann thinks: No!

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically. More on this ▶Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at) New access (yachtrevue.at) 8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at) Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto .at) In the new trend: Shock-Down – how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (trend.at) The 35 best family series for laughing and feeling good (tv-media.at) E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and Prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

Just do nothing and enjoy the time? Nothing. This is unthinkable for many people today. Too great the fear that you might miss something or simply “” no time “” for it. The philosopher and political scientist and author (“” Being lazy is hard work “”) Martin Liebmann explains why it is so difficult for us – but at the same time so important.

Mr. Liebmann, haven’t you done anything today? I haven’t gotten to that today. I was probably too lazy for that.

You are on the board of the association for time delay: are you on time? Believe it or not, I’m very punctual. I consider it disrespectful to impose a delay on other people.

How often do you check the clock? Since I almost never have a watch with me, this rarely happens. The only one that I wear more often on my wrist is one without a dial and without a pointer. I like to look at them.

Why is it so difficult for us not to do anything? On the one hand, because our pace of life is so incredibly fast and carries us along like a river. Anyone who doesn’t eagerly crank their arms threatens to drown. We are also told from an early age that being lazy is indecent. But I suspect that it is so difficult for most people because we meet ourselves at leisure. What if all of a sudden there is a great void? The very idea can be scary.

Am I missing something if I do nothing? Of course! But given that we miss almost everything, that’s nothing to worry about. I think it’s wonderful to miss a lot. Instead of noticing very little of a lot of things in non-stop multitasking, I prefer to take the time and rest for the things that are really important to me.

Why should we do that at all – do nothing? To meet ourselves and to feel what a gift it is to just be. If I have to fight for every little recognition and do something, that’s not only incredibly exhausting, but also goes against happiness in life. For the ancient Greek philosophers, leisure as the sister of freedom was even one of the highest goals in life.

What is the difference between doing nothing and being bored? Boredom is an agony, while conscious inactivity is a state in which I am really free. Our constant distractions and attempts to pass the time only make us fall even faster into boredom. The more entertaining we shape our life, the faster we get bored – and the more difficult it becomes to dwell with yourself for a long time and to find leisure.

Many people think they don’t have time to do nothing. What do you advise them? I hate to give advice, especially not general advice. I prefer to ask questions. My favorite question is, “What is really, really important to you?” We all have the same amount of time every day. The differences are in how we fill them in: filled or fulfilled. Another nice question can be formulated from this.

What do you want in terms of how we deal with time? That we take more time to think together and discuss what will get better if we speed it up and what will get better if we take it slower. Time is the key to a good life and coexistence.

About the person: Martin Liebmann, born in 1966, is chairman of the Association for the Delay of Time and has made it his business to encourage people to use time more consciously. The studied philosopher and political scientist has been working as a brand consultant for 25 years and, at the age of 52, came to the realization that it should now take it easy and give more space to idleness. He prefers to do this in Sardinia, where he pauses for hours and looks at the sea.

You can get the book here. (*)

The links marked with an asterisk (*) are so-called affiliate links. If you click on such an affiliate link and shop via this link, we will receive a commission from the online shop or provider concerned. For you the price doesn’t change.

About the book: Being lazy is hard workAn ode to idleness224 pages ISBN: 978-3-8312-0546-2 We have to be effective, structured and flexible. This is what the labor market wants, and this is what the economy wants. Those who cannot assert themselves against the competition remain on the career ladder. So we work 60 hours, check our emails on Sundays and continue to optimize our morning routine. Is that good for us, our society and our environment? Martin Liebmann thinks: No!

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically. More on this ▶Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at) New access (yachtrevue.at) 8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at) Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto .at) In the new trend: Shock-Down – how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (trend.at) The 35 best family series for laughing and feeling good (tv-media.at) E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and Prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

Just do nothing and enjoy the time? Nothing. This is unthinkable for many people today. Too great the fear that you might miss something or simply “” no time “” for it. The philosopher and political scientist and author (“” Being lazy is hard work “”) Martin Liebmann explains why it is so difficult for us – but at the same time so important.

Mr. Liebmann, haven’t you done anything today? I haven’t gotten to that today. I was probably too lazy for that.

You are on the board of the association for time delay: are you on time? Believe it or not, I’m very punctual. I consider it disrespectful to impose a delay on other people.

How often do you check the clock? Since I almost never have a watch with me, this rarely happens. The only one that I wear more often on my wrist is one without a dial and without a pointer. I like to look at them.

Why is it so difficult for us not to do anything? On the one hand, because our pace of life is so incredibly fast and carries us along like a river. Anyone who doesn’t eagerly crank their arms threatens to drown. We are also told from an early age that being lazy is indecent. But I suspect that it is so difficult for most people because we meet ourselves at leisure. What if all of a sudden there is a great void? The very idea can be scary.

Am I missing something if I do nothing? Of course! But given that we miss almost everything, that’s nothing to worry about. I think it’s wonderful to miss a lot. Instead of noticing very little of a lot of things in non-stop multitasking, I prefer to take the time and rest for the things that are really important to me.

Why should we do that at all – do nothing? To meet ourselves and to feel what a gift it is to just be. If I have to fight for every little recognition and do something, that’s not only incredibly exhausting, but also goes against happiness in life. For the ancient Greek philosophers, leisure as the sister of freedom was even one of the highest goals in life.

What is the difference between doing nothing and being bored? Boredom is an agony, while conscious inactivity is a state in which I am really free. Our constant distractions and attempts to pass the time only make us fall even faster into boredom. The more entertaining we shape our life, the faster we get bored – and the more difficult it becomes to dwell with yourself for a long time and to find leisure.

Many people think they don’t have time to do nothing. What do you advise them? I hate to give advice, especially not general advice. I prefer to ask questions. My favorite question is, “What is really, really important to you?” We all have the same amount of time every day. The differences are in how we fill them in: filled or fulfilled. Another nice question can be formulated from this.

What do you want in terms of how we deal with time? That we take more time to think together and discuss what will get better if we speed it up and what will get better if we take it slower. Time is the key to a good life and coexistence.

About the person: Martin Liebmann, born in 1966, is chairman of the Association for the Delay of Time and has made it his business to encourage people to use time more consciously. The studied philosopher and political scientist has been working as a brand consultant for 25 years and, at the age of 52, came to the realization that it should now take it easy and give more space to idleness. He prefers to do this in Sardinia, where he pauses for hours and looks at the sea.

You can get the book here. (*)

The links marked with an asterisk (*) are so-called affiliate links. If you click on such an affiliate link and shop via this link, we will receive a commission from the online shop or provider concerned. For you the price doesn’t change.

About the book: Being lazy is hard workAn ode to idleness224 pages ISBN: 978-3-8312-0546-2 We have to be effective, structured and flexible. This is what the labor market wants, and this is what the economy wants. Those who cannot assert themselves against the competition remain on the career ladder. So we work 60 hours, check our emails on Sundays and continue to optimize our morning routine. Is that good for us, our society and our environment? Martin Liebmann thinks: No!